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  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
RESA Australia and Austmine have developed the Hot Rubble website to provide closer links between Mining and METS industry companies and placement opportunities in the industry.  Hot Rubble, a one-st...

RESA Australia and Austmine have developed the Hot Rubble website to provide closer links between Mining and METS industry companies and placement opportunities in the industry. 

Hot Rubble, a one-stop source of information and advice to connect students with real opportunities in the Mining industry and METS sector.

If you are interested in working in a fast moving industry that values innovation, continuous improvement and team work and is using leading edge technologies to drive better productivity and performance – Mining and METS could be the industry sector for you!

  1.   Smart Trades
  2.    Private
BUSY At Work started way back in 1977 with the simple aim to deliver training and employment programs to homeless youth on the Gold Coast. BUSY stands for Backing Unemployed Southport Youth and was fo...

BUSY At Work started way back in 1977 with the simple aim to deliver training and employment programs to homeless youth on the Gold Coast. BUSY stands for Backing Unemployed Southport Youth and was founded by our President Martin Punch who set out to deliver this aim by obtaining funding from the Australian Government to run a community youth support program.

A little over twenty years later in 1998, BUSY successfully tendered for the Australian Government’s Apprenticeships Support Services and from then on became known as BUSY At Work. BUSY At Work has remained a not-for-profit association with the same values that have guided our decisions and our behaviour for 40 years. Over this time we have provided Apprenticeship Support Services to more than 40,000 businesses across Queensland and are the longest serving provider of Apprenticeship Support Services in the state.

In 2017, BUSY At Work merged with ON-Q Disability Services. ON-Q have been supporting people with a disability for over 30 years. Their experience and knowledge within the disability employment sector is an invaluable asset and together we are able to place more people into jobs across a larger footprint.

The BUSY Group currently employees 263 people across 45 offices and are consistently looking at ways to reinvest in initiatives to support communities with skills training and employment opportunities.

 

  1.   Smart Trades
  2.    Private
Construction Skills Queensland (CSQ) is an independent industry-funded body supporting employers, workers, apprentices and career seekers in the building and construction industry. The industry is th...

Construction Skills Queensland (CSQ) is an independent industry-funded body supporting employers, workers, apprentices and career seekers in the building and construction industry.

The industry is the perfect place to build your career and there’s so much to like. You can:

  • Learn on the job, not just in the classroom
  • Earn while you learn with an apprenticeship or traineeship (with no HECS debt!)
  • Feel a sense of achievement watching plans come to life as you build something
  • Benefit from heaps of different career pathways – choose from over 70 job types and maybe even have your own small business one day
  • Enjoy a change of scenery – different job sites mean no staring at the same walls week after week
  • Stay in demand – we’ll always need houses, buildings, roads and bridges.

 

  1.   Innovation
  2.    Private
The vision was to create an operating environment — a precinct — that would assist SA businesses in their move up the value chain and into global markets, in an environment for industry to innovate an...

The vision was to create an operating environment — a precinct — that would assist SA businesses in their move up the value chain and into global markets, in an environment for industry to innovate and grow through connection to research and education and through collaboration with each other.

Tonsley’s economic development objectives are the commercialisation of research and the student experience, growth through innovation and showcasing South Australia as the best place to do business.

Tonsley Innovation District’s four focus sectors are health, medical devices and assistive technologies, cleantech and renewable energy, automation, software and simulation, and mining and energy services.

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
Manufacturing is undergoing a dramatic transformation, worldwide. Manufacturers are creatively diversifying their focus across different stages of the manufacturing process, both before and after good...

Manufacturing is undergoing a dramatic transformation, worldwide. Manufacturers are creatively diversifying their focus across different stages of the manufacturing process, both before and after goods are produced. As production activities are gradually being outsourced to developing countries offering cheap labour, more Australian manufacturers are recognising the need to compete on value rather than cost. Most commonly, this involves contributing innovative products, components or services within global supply chains. 

Australia had already begun to transition from low-skilled production to high-skilled manufacturing.

Australia’s comparatively high labour costs mean companies will continue to automate and export production jobs. But technological progress is creating a new wave of higher-skilled work – across all sectors of manufacturing.

This work extends from design, through prototyping and small-scale pilot manufacturing, scaling to commercial production, collaboration, recycling and servicing.

Half of manufacturing hours worked today are spent on manual jobs.

  • In an analysis of North American and European manufacturing jobs, it was found that roughly 48% of hours primarily relied on the use of manual or physical labor.
  • By the year 2030, it’s estimated that only 35% of time will be spent on such routine work. 

Automation’s impact will be felt by the mid-2020s.

  • According to a recent report from PwC, the impact on OECD jobs will start to be felt in the mid-2020s.
  • By 2025, for example, it’s projected that 10-15% of jobs in three sectors (manufacturing, transportation and storage, and wholesales and retail trade) will have high potential for automation.
  • By 2035, the range of jobs with high automation potential will be closer to 35-50% for those sectors. 

Industrial robot prices are decreasing.

  • Industrial robot sales are sky high, mainly the result of falling industry costs.
  • This trend is expected to continue, with the cost of robots falling by 65% between 2015 and 2025.
  • With the cost of labor generally rising, this makes it more difficult to keep low-skilled jobs. 
  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
Ribit is Australia's leading job and internship matching platform for high-value, higher-education students. We connect students with STEM and digital skills to supportive, innovative employers who wi...

Ribit is Australia's leading job and internship matching platform for high-value, higher-education students. We connect students with STEM and digital skills to supportive, innovative employers who will help you develop new skills and experience.

Ribit is a platform connecting tertiary students looking for relevant paid work experience, internships or part-time work with innovative businesses in Australia.

Ribit is free to use. Simply signup and create your profile and let the Ribit's smart recommendation system help find the perfect job for you, based on your skills, interests and availability. The more detailed your profile the better the job matches will be.

  1.   Innovation
  2.    Private
Queensland Centre for Advanced Technologies (QCAT) is an integrated research and development precinct for the resources and advanced technology industries.A world-class research and development precin...

Queensland Centre for Advanced Technologies (QCAT) is an integrated research and development precinct for the resources and advanced technology industries.

A world-class research and development precinct, QCAT is focused on providing the highest standard science, engineering and innovation to the Australian mining, exploration, minerals processing, and manufacturing industries, with particular focus on those resources and industries located in Queensland.

A collaboration between the CSIRO, the Queensland Government, cooperative research centres and R&D industries, QCAT aims to increase the international competitiveness and efficiency of Queensland’s and Australia’s resource-based and related industries.

A number of leading R&D providers have moved to the precinct, attracted by the world-class facilities and potential for collaboration with CSIRO. This has seen the development of a number of key R&D clusters including:

Smart mining 
Australia's low emission coal technology and Hydrogen
Autonomous systems
Advanced minerals processing

The synergy between groups onsite and QCAT’s industry collaborators has also led to the development of two new emerging R&D clusters in niche manufacturing and advanced aeronautical engineering. 

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
The Australian electrical supply chain is experiencing an unprecedented transformation of the way in which electricity is generated, transmitted, distributed and consumed by the Australian public. Aus...

The Australian electrical supply chain is experiencing an unprecedented transformation of the way in which electricity is generated, transmitted, distributed and consumed by the Australian public. Australians are changing the way they use energy, and are embracing new technologies such as solar, wind power, and battery storage.

The transformation is being driven by the emergence of new technologies, increased consumer demands, greater environmental awareness and government reforms. The industry is also being impacted by the global megatrend of digitisation. 

This transformation is also changing the nature of jobs in the energy sector. A 50% Renewable Electricity (50RE) scenario in 2030 will lead to over 28,000 new jobs, nearly 50% more employment than a business as usual scenario.

Jobs are created in the construction, operation and maintenance of renewable energy installations, as well as in related industries.

Job losses in coal fired electricity generation are more than compensated for by increased employment in the renewable energy sector. However, the transition for employees in the fossil fuel sector must be planned well.

A large proportion of new jobs gained in the electricity supply sector by 2030 will stem from construction and installation activities related to renewable energy infrastructure. Many of these jobs will be additional to the economy, though location and skills may differ from those currently in demand.

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
The Australian agricultural sector plays
a crucial role in the national economy. The sector directly employs around 228,000 on-farm domestic workers and contributes nearly $60 billion to the nation’s ...

The Australian agricultural sector plays
a crucial role in the national economy. The sector directly employs around 228,000 on-farm domestic workers and contributes nearly $60 billion to the nation’s economy.

In addition, over
1.5 million Australians are employed in diverse industries servicing and providing support to the agricultural sector across the country, including manufacturers, drivers, retailers, teachers, research scientists, veterinarians, technology developers, biosecurity officers and engineers.

The potential for the sector to grow into a $100 billion industry over the next decade will depend on its ability to work collaboratively, grow sustainably, understand the needs of future customers, unlock the value of new technologies across the entire supply chain, and attract people and capital.

Developing scenarios that discuss the supply and demand of the future agricultural workforce in 2030 highlights the possibility of several challenges and opportunities over the next decade for the Australian and state governments, agricultural stakeholders and communities.

Placing a greater emphasis on equipping students with relevant skills, as well as promoting agricultural knowledge and career opportunities at every stage of education within both regional and urban schools, could help increase awareness among young people of the career opportunities in agriculture. 


Adapting education curricula and catering to the emerging skills requirements driven by technologies could further unlock the true value of precision agriculture, robotic technologies and innovative farming techniques that are changing the way food and fibre is grown and produced 
in Australia. 


Establishing open data initiatives that enable well-coordinated big data on all agricultural inputs to be freely shared between farm operators and stakeholders has the potential to improve overall agricultural productivity over the next decade. However, there is a need to develop an agricultural research workforce with sufficient technological knowledge and skills to understand, adapt and efficiently apply big data approaches in agriculture. 


Introducing the need for labour providers to be accredited and consistent monitoring of third-parties that help secure seasonal labour for farms would help reduce the likelihood of worker exploitation.

Funding trials to test new technologies and address issues that arise with early adoption could accelerate uptake of technology across Australian farms.

Creating opportunities for Australia’s private sector to invest in new and emerging agricultural innovations could improve the responsiveness and usefulness of agricultural technologies on Australian farms.

Continued public and private investments on agricultural mitigation options addressing societal concerns over climate change could offer Australian agriculture an avenue for competitive advantage.

Making regional cities and towns more attractive places
to live and locate businesses via investment in key infrastructure (including digital infrastructure to address connectivity issues), as well as improving access to education and health services within regional areas, would help agricultural firms attract and retain more skilled labour.

 

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
Transportation is a crucial part of the Australian economy, generating significant benefits that are shared across all sectors and regions. Transportation is also an important employer, occupying 625...

Transportation is a crucial part of the Australian economy, generating significant benefits that are shared across all sectors and regions.

Transportation is also an important employer, occupying 625,000 Australians and generating above-average earnings. However, work in this sector is poised for dramatic change in the years ahead – partly because of technology, but also because of other factors (such as rapid evolution in the organisation of work and the nature of employment relationships).

It is the responsibility of all stakeholders in transportation to prepare for that change – to manage it, minimise its costs, and maximise its benefits.

In total, 625,000 Australians work in transportation.

Of these, road transportation is the largest single source of transportation work, accounting for close to 270,000 positions, or over 40 percent of all transportation work.

Employment in other direct transport modes is smaller with 100,000 jobs in total across the rail, air, and marine modes.

Ancillary and support service functions are increasingly important in total transportation work, reflecting the outsourcing of various functions to independent service providers (and the corresponding fragmentation of the overall supply chain). For example, postal and courier services now account for close to 100,000 jobs, with another 80,000 jobs in transportation support services, and close to 60,000 in warehousing.

  1.   Sustainability
  2.    Private
The RAPAD region is ready to take the next step in reinventing itself as one of the most resilient communities in Australia underpinned by renewable energy.  In February 2018 a determined cluster of ...

The RAPAD region is ready to take the next step in reinventing itself as one of the most resilient communities in Australia underpinned by renewable energy.

 In February 2018 a determined cluster of seven central west local government areas shared a vision, which was endorsed by government and industry, for the region to generate Queensland’s electricity needs from renewable energy, in turn facilitating transformative economic and social benefit for the region, while becoming an energy super power of the low carbon world.

The Barcaldine Regional Council area has already welcomed renewable energy generators into the community but on a harvesting and output model.

The report highlights industries like aquaculture, intensive horticulture, manufacturing that could be attracted to cheap clean energy.

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
Queensland’s defence industries employ more than 6500 people, and generated an estimated $6.3 billion in revenue in 2015-16. The state is underpinned by a strong defence industrial base and world- cl...

Queensland’s defence industries employ more than 6500 people, and generated an estimated $6.3 billion in revenue in 2015-16.

The state is underpinned by a strong defence industrial base and world- class capabilities in a range of areas including aerospace support, ship repair and overhaul, heavy vehicle support and upgrades, command and control systems, reconnaissance and surveillance systems, unmanned vehicles, and cyber security. This positions Queensland at the front line of the defence industry in Australia and an innovative science and technology hub.

Development of local defence companies, combined with access to global supply chains, has led to many technological advances
in fields like nanotechnology, communications, automotive, marine, information technology, electronics, precision manufacturing and aerospace.

The geopolitical shift in focus to the Indo-Pacific region suggests more of Australia’s defence activities will move northward. This highlights the state's key role in creating strong, complementary defence industries, particularly in regional Queensland where a large portion of Defence personnel are based.

A hallmark of successful Queensland defence companies is their technical innovation and capacity to produce high-quality, low-volume defence products developed to global standards. Drawing together industry, researchers and businesses, Queensland is actively developing capabilities such as robotics, artificial intelligence and trusted autonomous systems, positioning the state as a global leader in innovative technologies.

  1.   Innovation
  2.    Private
The Hydrogen Industry Cluster will drive crucial collaboration across the emerging hydrogen value chain, building the scale and capabilities of existing industry start-ups, scale-ups and SMEs and furt...

The Hydrogen Industry Cluster will drive crucial collaboration across the emerging hydrogen value chain, building the scale and capabilities of existing industry start-ups, scale-ups and SMEs and further leveraging and developing their technologies that will sustain a clean, innovative, competitive and safe hydrogen industry. 

The Cluster will also connect cluster members with leading Australian research organisations, supporting the commercialisation of their IP in Australia, creating high value jobs, securing investment and ultimately supporting hydrogen exports driven by a world-leading hydrogen supply chain of technology solutions and services.

The announcement of the Hydrogen Industry Cluster and NERA’s role forms a key part of the National Hydrogen Strategy released by the Council for Australian Governments (COAG).

The National Hydrogen Strategy has been developed by Australian Governments to create the necessary social and regulatory framework that allows the hydrogen industry to expand, and sets out the foundations needed for Australian businesses to develop a vibrant hydrogen industry that benefits all Australians, while meeting safety and community standards. The aim of the strategy is to: 

  • build a clean, innovative and competitive hydrogen industry; 
  • position Australia’s hydrogen industry as a major global player by 2030; and 
  • coordinate the approach to projects that support hydrogen industry development.
  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
Cyber security is a shared responsibility between governments, the private sector and individuals. International cyber issues present challenges and opportunities for all Australians, every day. Aust...

Cyber security is a shared responsibility between governments, the private sector and individuals.

International cyber issues present challenges and opportunities for all Australians, every day. Australia’s interests in cyberspace are diverse and interconnected, from capturing the economic prosperity promised by digital trade, to combating cybercrime and preserving peace in cyberspace. Australia’s International Cyber Engagement Strategy has seven key themes, outlining Australia’s plans to:

  • maximise opportunities for economic growth and prosperity through digital trade
  • foster good cyber security practices
  • reduce the risk of cybercrime
  • promote peace and stability in cyberspace
  • advocate for multi-stakeholder Internet governance
  • promote respect for human rights and democratic principles online
  • encourage the use of digital technologies to achieve sustainable development.

The global nature of cyberspace means Australia must engage internationally to advance and protect our shared interests in cyberspace. Australia’s international cyber engagement champions an open, free and secure Internet, which drives economic growth, protects national security and fosters international stability.

To increase the number of skilled cyber security professionals, Box Hill Institute with industry support have developed two national cyber security qualifications: a Certificate IV in Cyber Security and an Advanced Diploma of Cyber Security. These are the first nationally-recognised cyber security vocational education qualifications in Australia.

Box Hill Institute delivered the first courses at its Melbourne campus in early 2018, with student numbers doubling at each intake. TAFEs across other states and territories have partnered with Box Hill Institute to deliver these qualifications. The increased availability of courses will provide students with highly sought-after skills and help bridge the cyber security skill gap.

  1.   Innovation
  2.    Private
Robotics is used in factories, hospitals, mines, farms and environments such as work sites and natural terrain, where the robots must safeguard themselves while performing non-repetitive tasks and obj...

Robotics is used in factories, hospitals, mines, farms and environments such as work sites and natural terrain, where the robots must safeguard themselves while performing non-repetitive tasks and objective sensing as well as self-navigation in random, harsh or dynamic environments.

Robotics includes technologies such as sensors, management and control systems, decision-making, learning and adaptation, and intelligent systems.

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
The METS sector is also a significant contributor to employment in Australia, with around 
322,000 jobs in the specialised part of sector in 2017/18. This represents just over 2.5% of total employment...

The METS sector is also a significant contributor to employment in Australia, with around 
322,000 jobs in the specialised part of sector in 2017/18. This represents just over 2.5% of total employment in Australia. Employment in the specialised METS sector peaked in 2011/12 at 455,000 and then fell back to pre-boom levels in 2015/16, as shown in Figure 3. Over the last two years, job numbers have grown strongly.

The need for a profile of a METS career has evolved. Companies requiring certain capabilities to be able to deliver innovative (and especially digital) products and services to customers will be able to obtain these from individuals who may have a foundation in a non- traditional METS education such as data science but can rapidly obtain domain knowledge on the job or via micro-credentialing. Public awareness of the impact of AI, automation and robotics on future employment opportunities is growing.

School leavers are looking for assurance that the educational pathway they chose will empower them to develop their careers, rather than becoming redundant. The sector as a whole needs to address this concern, with proactive communications and case studies, but always in
the positive sense that METS and mining must be able to attract Australia’s youth to the sector.

TAFE and universities both have a role to play to address the supply of the future workforce. TAFE has the ability to rapidly adapt to these changing skill requirements for existing
and new workers, while universities provide a highly skilled workforce with graduates able to contribute to the development of innovation three to five years into the future.

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Public
Digital disruption is affecting all industries and business categories, but it particularly impacts individuals – all of whom have differing capabilities and skills. Not everybody is good at Maths an...

Digital disruption is affecting all industries and business categories, but it particularly impacts individuals – all of whom have differing capabilities and skills.

Not everybody is good at Maths and Science or English (brain). Some people have strong design skills (eye), some people have strong practical trade skills (hand). Some people have a mix of those skills. Some people have no skills. We have to support all of them. Because some will be left out, and we need to plan how we can include everybody.

In most cases the job threat from digital disruption represents replacement not displacement. A robot or software product or both will replace the job completely, not just displace or push workers into some other job opportunity. Because the impacts are happening across every industry sector, and in every country pretty much at the same time.

As a student, What should I study in the short term and longer term? And, How will the work environment I expect to enter change? Two simple questions. But highly relevant to students in schools, higher education and training. And to their parents. These questions are also important to the rest of us. Because the technologies that affect students, will also affect our jobs and workplaces into the future.

So what are the pathways to employment?

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
We have a jobs issue. Not enough jobs. Not enough well paying jobs. “New” jobs are only available to people with rare skills. There are an ever-increasing number of low wage – part time and slave cla...

We have a jobs issue. Not enough jobs. Not enough well paying jobs. “New” jobs are only available to people with rare skills.

There are an ever-increasing number of low wage – part time and slave class jobs. And there is deliberate fudging of the employment and underemployment figures for political comfort. Real unemployment and underemployment is near to 20% of the workforce, which is a big issue.

We have an education issue. We are educating for the disappeared and disappearing world.

Parents are a major contributor to this problem. They haven’t yet woken to the “lack of work” and “changing nature of work” environment and support school curricula based on their school experience. Teaching coding at school is not the answer. Promoting STEM or STEAM is not the answer. Both presuppose no real change in what “work is and what a job is” when both concepts are challenged by digital disruption.

First get clear on those 2 things and we can create a curriculum that delivers. We have a skills issue The impact of digital disruption affects all industries and business categories, but it particularly impacts individuals with different capabilities and skills.

Not everybody is good at maths and science (brain). Some people have strong design skills (eye), some people have strong practical trade skills (hand).

We have a creativity issue What can’t robots do? Be creative. We need creative skills, imagination and innovation more than ever before. We need to “try and see”, experiment, fail and learn, launch and learn, “what if?” We need to ask questions more than we ever have at any time in our history yet we are squashing creativity in our educational system.

Free education sponsors experimentation, trial, options. Having to pay for education encourages the payer to look for the return on investment. “I need a well paid job to pay down my loan.” Just at a time when the very notion of well paid jobs or finding jobs of any kind is under threat.

We have an inequality issue – the 1% Given that 8 men now own the same wealth as half the world’s population, or the top 10% of the population now own 85% of the world’s wealth. “World leaders are concerned”. But concern has not yet translated into action. Big businesses and the super rich dodge taxes, use their power to influence politics and drive down wages. And 1 in 10 people survive on less than $2 a day.

What can we do about it?

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