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  1.   ED Toolbox
  2.    Public
The ED Toolbox explains the challenges of digital disruption and outlines new study and work opportunities.   The “Challenges” section shows how 20+ disruptive technologies impact 400 business categ...

The ED Toolbox explains the challenges of digital disruption and outlines new study and work opportunities.

 

The “Challenges” section shows how 20+ disruptive technologies impact 400 business categories across 19 sectors.

Based on the results of over 50,000 surveys of adoption and use of ICT.

Presents Industry facts and figures, explains the technology threats, with options and opportunities…

Each page presents Industry facts and figures, explains the technology threats, with options and opportunities…

So parents and students can make better choices…

And showcases an example to illustrate how an organisation in the business category is using technology to advantage

 

The “Opportunities” section provides information for High Schools and Businesses in Public and Private libraries of videos, podcasts and other resources.

The High School Resource library contains curated information on Innovation, Sustainability, Future of Work, Study and Employment.

The Business Resource Library contains curated information on Innovation, Investment, Export, Sustainability and Future of Work.

New content is added regularly through a program of technology themes:

  • robotics in industry
  • augmented reality in regions
  • drones in industry
  • new service industries
  • future of work and jobs
  • 3D printing –makerspace
  • waste management & recycling
  • space technology
  • energy –hydrogen, solar, storage
  • water and environment
  • design thinking and so on.
  1.   Entrepreneurship
  2.    Public
The Idea – market research, networks, events Validation – market research, design, team, finance Startup – finance, pitching, social, legal, project management Acceleration – social, pitching, capi...

The Idea – market research, networks, events

Validation – market research, design, team, finance

Startup – finance, pitching, social, legal, project management

Acceleration – social, pitching, capital, team

  1.   Innovation
  2.    Public
STEM refers to science, technology, engineering and maths. STEAM is STEM plus the arts – humanities, language, dance, drama, music, visual arts, design and new media. Teachers working in cross-curricu...

STEM refers to science, technology, engineering and maths. STEAM is STEM plus the arts – humanities, language, dance, drama, music, visual arts, design and new media. Teachers working in cross-curricular STEAM settings often see students making connections between concepts and solving problems in new and exciting ways. STEAM is not a new concept. People such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Buckminster Fuller and Milton Glaser, schools such as the Bauhaus, Royal College of Art and MIT, companies such as GE, Pentagram and Apple have all shown us the importance of combining science and art.

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Public
Digital disruption is affecting all industries and business categories, but it particularly impacts individuals – all of whom have differing capabilities and skills. Not everybody is good at Maths and...

Digital disruption is affecting all industries and business categories, but it particularly impacts individuals – all of whom have differing capabilities and skills. Not everybody is good at Maths and Science or English (brain). Some people have strong design skills (eye), some people have strong practical trade skills (hand). Some people have a mix of those skills. Some people have no skills. We have to support all of them. Because some will be left out, and we need to plan how we can include everybody. In most cases the job threat from digital disruption represents replacement not displacement. A robot or software product or both will replace the job completely, not just displace or push workers into some other job opportunity. Because the impacts are happening across every industry sector, and in every country pretty much at the same time. As a student, What should I study in the short term and longer term? And, How will the work environment I expect to enter change? Two simple questions. But highly relevant to students in schools, higher education and training. And to their parents. These questions are also important to the rest of us. Because the technologies that affect students, will also affect our jobs and workplaces.

  1.   Future of Work
  2.    Private
We have a jobs issue. Not enough jobs. Not enough well paying jobs. “New” jobs are only available to people with rare skills. There are an ever-increasing number of low wage – part time and slave cla...
We have a jobs issue.
Not enough jobs. Not enough well paying jobs. “New” jobs are only available to people with rare skills. There are an ever-increasing number of low wage – part time and slave class jobs. And there is deliberate fudging of the employment and underemployment figures for political comfort. Real unemployment and underemployment is near to 20% of the workforce, which is a big issue.
We have an education issue.
We are educating for the disappeared and disappearing world. Parents are a major contributor to this problem. They haven’t yet woken to the “lack of work” and “changing nature of work” environment and support school curricula based on their school experience. Teaching coding at school is not the answer. Promoting STEM or STEAM is not the answer. Both presuppose no real change in what “work is and what a job is” when both concepts are challenged by digital disruption. First get clear on those 2 things and we can create a curriculum that delivers.
We have a skills issue
The impact of digital disruption affects all industries and business categories, but it particularly impacts individuals with different capabilities and skills. Not everybody is good at maths and science (brain). Some people have strong design skills (eye), some people have strong practical trade skills (hand).
We have a creativity issue
What can’t robots do? Be creative. We need creative skills, imagination and innovation more than ever before. We need to “try and see”, experiment, fail and learn, launch and learn, “what if?” We need to ask questions more than we ever have at any time in our history yet we are squashing creativity in our educational system. Free education sponsors experimentation, trial, options. Having to pay for education encourages the payer to look for the return on investment. “I need a well paid job to pay down my loan.” Just at a time when the very notion of well paid jobs or finding jobs of any kind is under threat.
We have an inequality issue – the 1%
Given that 8 men now own the same wealth as half the world’s population, or the top 10% of the population now own 85% of the world’s wealth. “World leaders are concerned”. But concern has not yet translated into action. Big businesses and the super rich dodge taxes, use their power to influence politics and drive down wages. And 1 in 10 people survive on less than $2 a day.
What can we do about it?
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